Michael Kwatia is a spoken word artist from London going by the stage name MOAK. His poem 'Ghana in Britain' (2013), speaks to the Ghanaian immigrant experience in London and the cultural heritages of his homeland.

"Never thought it would be a factor
Since I’m living in London and not Accra
But your family will tell you why it’s a crucial matter
They want us to embrace the western African lifestyle
Instead of us westernizing our lives now
Embrace it with open arms and hands
As you would when you have to greet any guest
And be sure that the hand you use
Won’t be your left”

Check out his Soundcloud

aadatart:

So the book, The Imported Ghanaian talks a lot about how Ghanaians speak, and common sayings we use. The author also talks about how we often test diaspora Ghanaians on their knowledge of twi to see how Ghanaian they really are. So I’ve created a fun test of sayings in twi, pidgin, and local jargon, to see how Ghanaian YOU are. Let us know what score you got!  Tag, you’re it!

Marisa Schwartz: Loud Silence Media in Ghana

Marisa Schwartz is co-founder of Loud Silence Media, a documentary production house based in Accra, Ghana in 2012. The group aims to document Ghanaian modernity, traditionalism, journalism and the politics immigration abroad. It also seeks to tell the stories of ordinary people, setting the stage for a new understanding about the role of media in Ghana.

"I’ve had the opportunity to work in the Ghanaian media industry for the last four years, in radio, print, and television journalism. While media in Ghana is mostly free and fair, there are prominent imbalances. Imbalance is something quite common in contemporary Ghana, a country wrestling with all its strength to accept modern technology and global customs while holding on to traditional beliefs and even managing to incorporate the two. Ghana’s imbalance in media mostly leans towards the heavy-hitter: politics. Politics dominates the air waves, newsstands, TV satellites, modems, and mobile connections. This is all good and informative, yet dangerous because it gives politicians and affluent members of society the opportunity to spread lies to millions of people. Sometimes they tell the truth, but sometimes they lie and there are few ways to check facts. The amount of political coverage is overwhelming and people tend to blindly believe what they hear on the news. Some journalistic efforts are fantastic, but others feel like the reporter is simply doing what he thinks media is supposed to be, rather than creative or investigative reporting." - Marisa Schwartz

The digital edition of Aaron Yeboah Jr.’s curatorial work African Lens is now available for purchase ($10) - featuring work by African photographers:
TJ Letsa
Fundiswa Ntoyi
Zakaria Wakrim
Dayo Adeoti 
Chelsea Boatey
Philipp Raheem
Andile Buka
David Uzochukwu

"African Lens is a visual collective from African photographers both in the motherland and the diaspora. The project aims at showcasing and sharing Africa as we know it using photography thus, an open window into the world of Africans via the lens of African Photographers.”

The digital edition of Aaron Yeboah Jr.’s curatorial work African Lens is now available for purchase ($10) - featuring work by African photographers:

"African Lens is a visual collective from African photographers both in the motherland and the diaspora. The project aims at showcasing and sharing Africa as we know it using photography thus, an open window into the world of Africans via the lens of African Photographers.”